Monthly Archives: November 2018

Writing English Essays: Peer Edit Feedback 2

Responsive feedback — blog post 2 for Writing English Essays students
Please write about two paragraphs, or 200 words, thinking about the peer edit we did in class November 21. Sample ideas: What did you discuss?– Was it productive?– What did you learn about your writing?– What did you learn about other people’s writing?– How do you feel your writing style is changing or growing over the semester?

British Soc & Lit 2: Hitchhiker’s Guide Podcast

Students in British Society & Literature 2 should listen to this podcast about Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Kyungho (Eliot) Lee.

  • Each group may ask up to two questions about the podcast for presentation question credit, using the “Leave a reply” comment link.
  • Kyungho is also responsible for answering your question in the comments.
  • I’ll be turning off the question function in about one week.

British Soc & Modern Novels Course Paper Project

Course Paper Project for British Society & Modern Novels

Topics approved

  1. LoF: There isn’t an “end of innocence” in the novel; the boys never were innocent.
  2. Brave: Bernard’s behavior is justified; he isn’t eccentric, but has reasons for his feelings.
  3. LoF: How the group identity of the boys blinds their morals and reasons.
  4. Dub: Similarities between Little Chandler and Farrington.
  5. LoF: What is the most important thing for Jack and Ralph, and how does it influence them?
  6. Brave: Why are people made to be desensitized to death in the World State?
  7. LoF: The benefits (but limits and problems) of democracy on the island.
  8. LoF: How Jack’s animality and Satanic imagery show his descent into evil.
  9. Brave: The role and symbolism of soma in the novel.
  10. Brave: What does the caste system represent, or reflect from the contemporary world?
  11. LoF: What is the connection between fear and politics in the novel?
  12. Dub: A comparison of the ‘realization’ endings in “Araby” and “Eveline.”
  13. Brave: Why is the World State afraid of people being alone too much?
  14. Lucky: Dixon taking Christine from Bertrand is not only male competition, but also conflict between the working class (Dixon) and the upper class (Welch’s family).
  15. Dub: The role of money to show master-slave relationships in “After the Race.”
  16. LoF: Would Ralph be really killed by Jack if the naval officer had not come to the island? How would that ending change the novel’s meaning?
  17. Brave: How does Chapter 3 help explain the novel?
  18. Lucky: Why doesn’t Dixon leave Margaret if he doesn’t love her?

Write a proposal for, and then write an MLA format argument paper of about 800-1000 words on one (or more) of the course texts: Dubliners, Brave New World, Lord of the Flies, or Lucky JimTry to discuss an issue or theme which explains the text(s); simply comparing two characters can be boring unless the comparison tells us something meaningful. Feel free to look at the blog questions or think about the presentations for ideas.

Due date, on paper: Monday, December 3 in class (no e-mails)

  1. The paper must state an argument with examples and reasons, focused on the text.
  2. It’s OK if you use evidence or history from the time period of the text to help explain it, so long as your emphasis is on the text. Do not write a paper which is really about your best friend or about K-Pop.
  3. The paper must directly quote from the text to prove your arguments. If your paper has three irrelevant quotes I will assume you didn’t read the text. Use short quotes rather than padding the paper with filler long quotes.
  4. Important!: Here is how the paper will work. You will e-mail me (keneckert @ hanyang. ac. kr) a 70+ word proposal, where you will describe what you are going to discuss and what question or argument you are going to answer or prove in your paper. You should do this soon, because: a) I won’t accept a paper without an accepted proposal; and b) once a proposal is accepted, no other student can write on the same argument. For this reason your proposal needs to be specific. I will reject vague, one-sentence proposals saying, e.g. “I will write about why x is bad.” How and why is he bad? How will you prove it?
  • Your second paper in this course will be a revision of this first paper, due on the last day of classes by e-mail (Sunday, December 16).
  • We will be spending four classes discussing how to plan and write academic argument papers.
  • Refer to the “Files” heading on this site for an example of MLA formatting. We’ll discuss this in class as well.
  • Grading will be on four criteria: Grammar; structure; argumentation, and text support (quoting). Each draft is worth 15%.

British Soc & Lit 2 Course Paper Project

Course Paper Project for British Society & Literature 2

Topics approved

  1. Pyg: It’s Mrs. Pearce who makes Eliza a lady.
  2. Pyg: The Greek legend and play compared; why is the play titled this, and how is Eliza different?
  3. Pyg: How do the characters define happiness, and how to they attain their ‘utopias’?
  4. Harry: Environment and influences are important in HP, and make Neville what he is.
  5. Hit: Marvin’s function is to show what humanity is, or what people desire.
  6. Harry: Why is it important, to Dumbledore, to not waste time staring at the Mirror of Erised?
  7. Harry: Does Hermione have a “complex” about being a mud blood? Is that why she studies?
  8. Harry: Hagrid says Gringotts is the safest place in the world except maybe Hogwarts; is it really, and why?
  9. Pyg: Why does Eliza move from the lower to upper class, and what does Shaw mean by it?
  10. Harry: Why, actually, do Hermione and Ron like Harry? Is there a logical reason why him and not other people?
  11. Murder: What does the snowstorm which traps the train represent?
  12. Poems: How do “Warren Pryor” by Alden Nowlan and “Digging” by Seamus Heaney show attitudes to work?
  13. Harry: Harry doesn’t actually have much free choice—most of the events of the novel are predetermined by circumstances.
  14. Harry: Are we sure that Hogwarts doesn’t really show favoritism to pure-blood wizards?

Write a proposal for, and then write an MLA format argument paper of about 800-1000 words on one (or more) of the course texts: Pygmalion, Murder on the Orient Express, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, or a poem we studiedTry to discuss an issue or theme which explains the text(s); simply comparing two characters can be boring unless the comparison tells us something meaningful. Feel free to look at the blog questions or think about the presentations for ideas.

Due date, on paper: Monday, December 3 in class (no e-mails)

  1. The paper must state an argument with examples and reasons, focused on the text.
  2. It’s OK if you use evidence or history from the time period of the text to help explain it, so long as your emphasis is on the text. Do not write a paper which is really about your best friend or about K-Pop.
  3. The paper must directly quote from the text to prove your arguments. If your paper has three irrelevant quotes I will assume you didn’t read the text. Use short quotes rather than padding the paper with filler long quotes.
  4. Important!: Here is how the paper will work. You will e-mail me (keneckert @ hanyang. ac. kr) a 70+ word proposal, where you will describe what you are going to discuss and what question or argument you are going to answer or prove in your paper. You should do this soon, because: a) I won’t accept a paper without an accepted proposal; and b) once a proposal is accepted, no other student can write on the same argument. For this reason your proposal needs to be specific. I will reject vague, one-sentence proposals saying, e.g. “I will write about why x is bad.” How and why is he bad? How will you prove it?
  • Your second paper in this course will be a revision of this first paper, due on the last day of classes by e-mail (Sunday, December 16).
  • We will be spending four classes discussing how to plan and write academic argument papers.
  • Refer to the “Files” heading on this site for an example of MLA formatting. We’ll discuss this in class as well.
  • Grading will be on four criteria: Grammar; structure; argumentation, and text support (quoting). Each draft is worth 15%.

British Soc & Lit 2 Blog Post 4 (Harry Potter)

Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone – J.K. Rowling (1997)

Blog posts due and presentation day: Thursday, December 6

  • Group 6: Podcast

Write a post here of two paragraphs (about 200 words) discussing the novel; or make your post a reply to someone else’s post. Feel free to make your post a reply to someone else’s post if you like. Choose one topic for your presentation or for online discussion or your paper. One topic per group. A narrow, focused discussion is usually more interesting.

  1. Does Dumbledore act as a sort of ‘father’ to Harry, or does Hagrid or another person fit this role better? How and why?
  2. Are there funny scenes in the novel, or things satirized from the real world, such as campus sports (Quidditch) or junk food? How does Rowling create humor in the story?
  3. Some religious or parents groups complain that children should not read such stories about witchcraft and magic. Are novels such as this good for children? What lessons do they learn from this book?
  4. Discuss the ‘antique’ technology in the novel. For example, why is everything done with owls and candles and such? Why can’t Hogwarts have Wi-Fi and laptops and have the students arrive by flying KTX trains? Why is there some technology?
  5. Snape always seems misjudged in the novel. Is he a sympathetic character? Is there a reason why he always appears evil and is vindicated at the end of the story?
  6. Hermione is a perfectionist and always seems stressed, but she breaks down and cries at one point. Analyze her character, or discuss another female. Is there a reason why the story is so male-centered, when it’s written by a woman?
  7. Research residential boarding schools in England. Is Hogwarts like these schools? Do you see any reason why the story is set in such a school?
  8. Much of the novel is very sad, dealing with Harry’s feelings of loss over his parents, or the cruelty of the Dursleys. For many other characters family is very important. Does this also have a reason or purpose in the novel?
  9. Authority works strangely in the novel. For some minor actions the students receive harsh punishments; but at times, such as when he tries to find the stone, Harry disobeys the rules in ways which should get him in serious trouble but is praised. Why?
  10. Take a scene in the novel and analyze it closely. How does Rowling present the events and dialogue? What sort of techniques or meanings does she choose?

British Soc & Modern Novels Blog Post 4 (Lucky Jim)

Lucky Jim – Kingsley Amis (1954)

Blog posts due and presentation day: Monday, December 10

  • Group 7: [Podcast] Who is the worst person in the novel? Bertrand.
  • Group 8: ?

Write a post here of two paragraphs (about 200 words) discussing Lucky Jim. Feel free to make your post a reply to someone else’s post if you like. Choose one topic for your presentation or for online discussion or your paper. One topic per group. A narrow, focused discussion is usually more interesting.

  1. Do you like Dixon, or sympathize with him? Would you want him as a friend?
  2. Discuss Margaret or Christine. How do they influence or change Dixon?
  3. Welch seems strangely forgiving of Dixon’s actions. Is Welch a bad or good man, or is he just a little stupid?
  4. Discuss morality in the novel. Who are the worst people in the story?
  5. Amis has been accused of hating women– are his portrayals of women in the novel fair?
  6. What do you think is the funniest scene in the novel? Describe and discuss how Amis makes the scene funny.
  7. Do you think the novel satirizes universities or English society? How or why?
  8. Why is Jim Dixon lucky? (Or is he?)
  9. Does Dixon grow up throughout the novel, or change? How and why?
  10. Some critics believe the ending is contrived or unrealistic, that Dixon doesn’t deserve to be “saved” by Gore-Urquhart. Do you agree?